A CONCEPTUAL EXAMINATION OF COLLEGE ATHLETES' ROLE CONFLICT THROUGH THE LENS OF CONSERVATION OF RESOURCES THEORY

In this conceptual article, we seek to extend the domain of the conservation of resources (COR) theory to the collegiate student–athlete population in the context of academic–athletic role conflict and stress. Aside from reviewing the direct effects academic–athletic role conflict may have on psychological strain, this conceptual study also continues to build on the theory by proposing mediational pathways of role conflict, and the moderating effects of personal characteristics and social support on the stressor–strain relationship. Although this theoretical framework has been mainly applied in the work–family context, it could be proven useful in alleviating the pressures resulting from student–athletes’ competing roles by providing stress-coping strategies. Focusing on addressing student–athletes’ challenges in managing their college careers, the study provides a theoretical foundation for enhancing student–athletes’ well-being and collegiate experiences. Implications for managerial practices and research are discussed.

KEYWORDS: Academic–athletic role conflictconservation of resources theorystress

If you would like more information about this study, please don't hesitate to contact us!

©2018 by The University of Florida's The Liminars Project.